Sharp as a razor blade.
In1976, James Nitsch’s Polaroid camera SX-70 buzzed. Forty years later, not only the photographic image, but also the motif itself still remains. Rather than producing mere Polaroid images, Nitsch created witty, conceptual, three-dimensional works of art that vacillate between Ready-

made, sculpture and photography. One of Nitsch’s most famous works, “Razor Blade”, exemplifies his unique approach: his combination and juxtaposition of object and image.  A razor blade  brown and rusty after four decades, cuts into a Polaroid that shows the same blade as it was then: new and sharp. Forty years of time collapse in the space of a few centimetres. Nitsch’s works are more than a form of instant communication, they are much more than mere snapshots. They are time travel machines, emblems of evanescence. In James Nitsch’s Polaroids, time is captured and locked up as it is in Andy Warhol’s “Time Capsules”. The artist bridges the shortest instant, , quickest photogra-
phic cut with a process in time that still continues forty years later. The ephemeral aspect of art has rarely been dealt with as radical and witty as in James Nitsch’s spectacular photo-objects.                                                                                                                                                                                                  Text: Marc Peschke

gentle touch, polaroid dip, 1975
gentle touch, polaroid dip, 1975